Hand Forms

Basics 4-of-6

Descriptions

This section is an attempt to define those movements considered essential in building a system adaptable to every individual. These are the foundation on which to build; and, without which, success is not assured. While the list is as complete as possible, there is bound to be some omission.

Hand Forms

Closed Fist

Fore Knuckle:

Place the fingertips in the crease of your palm. Fold your bent thumb over the 2nd and 3rd middle phalanges. Only the thumb and little finger are tight. The distal heads of the metacarpals are what you strike with. Preferably, the 2nd and 3rd, the 2nd before the 3rd. The Kata Punch rotates to a horizontal pronate position. It is not used except for Kata.

Back Knuckle:

With your hand closed as above, you strike with the posterior aspect of the metacarpal heads. The Back-Knuckle Twist strikes with the 5th through 2nd fore-knuckles by rotating your fist 180° posterior to anterior.

Hammer Fist:

Place the fingertips in the crease of your palm. Place your bent thumb on the 2nd proximal phalanx head. The medial aspect of the 5th metacarpal is the striking side for defining the Hammer Fist. The thumb is the striking side for the Reverse Hammer Fist. The Fore Knuckles are used for the so called "Thumbless Fist". And, the heads of the proximal phalanges are, also, used in striking in a hooking, or 'knocking' manner.

First Knuckle:

The hand is clenched as in the Fore Knuckle except the 2nd finger is extended and the distal phalanx of the thumb is pressing on the joint of the proximal and middle phalanges of the 2nd finger for striking in a thrusting manner.

Middle Knuckle:

The same as the First Knuckle except; the thumb is held as in the Fore Knuckle and the 3rd finger is extended for striking in a hooking manner, only.

Open Hand

Half Fist:

The fingers are bent so the tips are on, or near to, the anterior aspect of the metacarpal heads; the thumb straight, against the 2nd metacarpal. The strike is delivered with the heads of the proximal phalanges; primarily, the 3rd and 4th

Knife Hand:

The hand, (and all the fingers), is held straight. The striking surface is the pisiform bone of the wrist. The Reverse Knife Hand has the thumb folded in toward the palm, and the striking surface is the 2nd metacarpal proximal phalanx joint and 2nd proximal phalanx bone. The Knife Hand Thrust is delivered with the 2nd through 5th fingertips.

Finger Thrust:

Using the pads of the fingertips. One Finger refers to the 2nd digit extended and pressed against the middle phalanx of the 3rd digit; the other digits held as in the Half Fist. Supported One Finger has the 3rd digit posterior to and pressing on the 2nd digit to support it; the thumb on the middle phalanx of the 4th digit. Two Finger; the 2nd and 3rd digits are separated and strike independent targets the thumb is on the middle phalanx of the 4th digit the hand is closed. The Four Finger, also known as "Four Finger Eye Shot", is formed like the Knife Hand except, the fingers are separated. It is usually used palm down.

Tiger Mouth:

The fingers are tensed, together and slightly bent; the thumb is opposed, tensed and, also, slightly bent. The strike is delivered with the web of the hand.

Tiger Claw:

Hand is cupped, fingers outspread, strike with Palm Heel first, then fingertips. When grabbing with the Tiger Claw the tips of the fingers dig in to grip; not wrap around.

Crane Claw:

Fingers bent and outspread thumb straight alongside 2nd digit. Rake with the fingertips.

Palm:

Hand is held like the Knife Hand except; the palm is cupped. Strike is delivered in an inward motion with the whole area. The exact reverse of the Palm is the Back Hand.

Palm Heel:

The hand is flexed upward, the fingers together and slightly bent; the base of the Capitate carpal bone, or the Pisiform, forms the striking surface.

Crane:

The fingers are straight and bent 90° at the metacarpal heads, the thumb is on the joint of the proximal and middle phalanges of the 2nd finger. The wrist is bent, elbow down. The bent wrist forms the striking surface of the Crane Wrist. When the tips of all the digits are pressed together this forms the striking surface of the Crane Beak.

Thumb:

Usually used with the hand in the Knife Hand position. Used in a thrusting manner, the striking surface is the tip of the thumb. Placing the distal phalanx of the thumb on the joint of the proximal and middle phalanges of the 2nd finger, creates the Supported Thumb giving more versatility in striking. The Gouging Thumb is used when gripping. The thumb tip is pressed into the target and manipulated while the fingers anchor the hands to the target area.